Professor Victor Mair and 肏 (F�ck)

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There's is a guy, named Victor H Mair, a linguist who specialize in Chinese, who also write blogs for the Language Log (a popular blog on linguistics). As i've read Victor's posts, he often attacks China with USA ideology. His posts is offensive to me.

Today, he posted a blog 〔Peace and Harmony By Victor Mair. @ languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu…〕, and went about his politically covered insults. In the article, it was talking about what'd the best character that represent chinese. (a theme from another article on the web.) The character discussed about is “和”, meaning: peace, harmony, and the conjunction “and”. He attacks it, calling it chinese propaganda, and suggests that the best char should be a made up char meaning noodle. (the char is not in Unicode, but can be seen here: Biáng biáng noodles)

Here's my response, posted as a comment.

It should be 肏 (cao4).

The word 肏, happens to be made up of 2 independent words. The top is 入 (ru4), meaning “enter”. The bottom is 肉 (ruo4), meaning “flesh”.

When a western sinologist proposes that the best chinese char to represent china is a made up char, i think the proper argument against is 肏.

I like it because it represents a fundamental activity of human animals, the candor of the writing system, and is directly connected to love. I think it is compatible with the candidate 和 (harmony) too. In juxtaposition, we have 肏和 (harmony by f�ck), or 和肏 (f�ck together). The latter signify working together in harmony. The former signify a biologically based way to make peace — a true racial harmony.

If for example, every white american have a chinese wife, or every yellow men have blonde girlfriends, then half of the hatred in the world would disappear. Your ideology, became my wife's ideology; my culture, became your pride. In a few generations, the world become as one.

Dear professor Victor Mair, in your next installment, can you give us your philosophization on the word 肏? We'd be interested in what you have to say. I think it would be spectacular.

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